Our Resume

For Jack, Mike, and me, there is nothing more gratifying than being effective political activists on behalf of taxpayers. With the support and enthusiasm of thousands of our supporters throughout the state, we've accomplished a great deal over the years. Here's a summary of our efforts together along with a really informative taxpayer-savings scorecard:

1995

(Tim): Got started with an initiative to force a public vote on the first sports stadium (I got a "whopping" 100 signatures at Greenlake Park, a few blocks from our previous Seattle home) - initiative qualified and voters said "no" to the sports stadium, but the Legislature said "yes, this sports stadium is a state emergency." That single, arrogant legislative act was the catalyst that inspired my political activism.

1997

(Tim & thousands of supporters statewide): co-sponsored and kicked off I-200 (banned race and gender preference affirmative action by state and local governments) - worked for nine months on it but ultimately begged John Carlson to take it over in September, 1997 because the signature gathering was going horribly - he and civil rights icon Ward Connerly from California successfully carried it over the finish line in 1998, with voters approving it 58%-42%

1998

(Tim & thousands of supporters statewide): did the NO CAR TAX INITIATIVE which would have repealed the state motor vehicle excise tax (MVET) over a two-year period -- didn't get enough signatures

1998

(Jack & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did a different vehicle tab reduction initiative and a separate property tax reduction initiative - didn't get enough signatures

1999

(efforts from this year forward involved the time, effort, and hard work of Tim, Jack & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-695 (repeal state MVET, voter approval for tax increases), 514,000 all-volunteer signatures, 2nd highest number of signatures in state history, voters approved it 56%-44%, courts said "no" - Locke & Legislature prodded to repeal state MVET (breakdown of tax savings is outlined below)

2000

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-722 (2% limit on property tax increases), voters approved it 56%-44%, courts said "no" - did I-747's 1% limit in response 2000 (Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-745 (90% of transportation taxes must be spent for roads), voters rejected it 40%-60%

2001

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-747 (1% limit on property tax increases), voters approved it 58%-42%, took effect without a single legal challenge (breakdown of tax savings is outlined below). Tightest limit on property tax growth of any state in the nation.

2002

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-776 ($30 Tabs for Everyone), voters approved it 52%-48%, lower court said "no" but state supreme court upheld it in 2003 and $39.2 million in refunds were mailed out shortly after. Nevertheless, Sound Transit refused to abide by the court's ruling and we returned to the state supreme court in 2006. Sound Transit's continued collection of $60 million per year from a tax explicitly repealed by the voters seemed totally wrong to us but the High court ruled in 2006 that since I-776 didn't EXPLICITLY require them to retire the bonds backed by the voter-repealed tax, they could continue to collect it. A subsequent initiative will be necessary to stop Sound Transit from collecting this voter-repealed vehicle tax.

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): We lobbied hard and succeeded at getting R-51, the $8 billion transportation tax increase, put to a public vote (special interest groups, politicians and the press wanted to pass it in Olympia). Voters rejected it 38%-62%, so thanks to our efforts, an $8 billion transportation tax increase was never implemented (in 2003, Locke & the Legislature ignored the voters' rejection of R-51's $8 billion increase, and unilaterally imposed a $4 billion increase and blocked any attempt by citizens to challenge it. They stuck their finger in the eye of the voters, but at least their $4 billion tax increase is $4 billion less than the $8 billion the voters rejected six months earlier. In other words, the net effect of our battles succeeded at saving taxpayers $4 billion)

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-267 (vehicle sales taxes spent for roads), didn't get enough signatures but the I-267 campaign very likely contributed to the defeat of R-51, the Legislature's $8 billion transportation tax increase because I-267 offered voters a no-new-taxes alternative to R-51

2003

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-807 (renew I-601's policies), didn't receive enough signatures but the Legislature's temporary suspension of I-601 expired at the conclusion of the 2003 legislative session so I-601's 2/3's for tax increases requirement, the anchor provision in I-807, is now law again. Also, we successfully blocked bills for tax increases and protected the initiative process from an unprecedented legislative jihad

(Tim, Jack, & Mike): filed STOP SOUND TRANSIT LIGHT RAIL initiative, but we got early feedback from supporters that it would be better to wait for state supreme court ruling on I-776 first. Never tried to get signatures, no money raised

2004

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did I-864(the 25% Property Tax Initiative) that would have reduced property taxes$550 million per year. It got 156,000 signatures but needed 198,000. Polling showed that it would have passed easily. This was a critical first step in our efforts to lower property taxes for everyone in Washington.

(Tim and a new coalition of supporters): did I-892 (Just Treat Us The Same) and got qualified for the ballot with 274,000 signatures. I-892 lowered property taxes for citizens but didn't cost the government a penny. It would have reduced property taxes $400 million per year. But tribal casinos spent an unprecedented $6 million against it, the most money spent against an initiative in state history.

(Tim and the King County Corrections Guild): did I-18 which shrinks the size of the King County Council from 13 politicians to 9. Got over 71,000 signatures, more than double the number necessary to qualify. The Cadillac Council tried to sabotage the effort but a lawsuit with Tim Eyman as lead plaintiff and several King County residents as co-plaintiffs succeeded and gave the voters the final say. The voters overwhelmingly approved the initiative and 4 politicians are out of a job in 2005 because of this common sense reform initiative.

2005

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did "Performance Audits of Government Initiative" I-900. The measure empowers the State Auditor to do comprehensive performance audits of state and local governments, hiring outside experts to examine state and local departments and agencies to identify ways to spend our tax money more effectively. It provides dedicated funding for the audits (roughly $10 million per year generated from a sliver of the existing sales tax). Our argument: isn't it worth spending the first $10 million of our tax money to learn whether the remaining $40 billion is being spent as cost effectively as possible? We had from February through early July, 2005 to gather the 225,000 signatures necessary to qualify for the November, 2005 ballot. Turned in 300,000+. After a hard fought campaign, voters approved the initiative with 56% of the vote. It has proved to be one of our most successful initiatives ever.

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did "Hands Off the People's Initiative" I-905. The measure protects the initiative and reference process. I-905 prohibits legislative changes to the initiative and referendum process unless approved by voters at a general election, and provides expedited judicial review of legislation to determine if its subject to referendum. Politicians need to keep their dirty, stinking hands off the citizens' right to initiative. The Legislature's ongoing legislative jihad against the constitutionally protected rights of citizens is outrageous. This exciting initiative would protect our rights to free speech and political participation. We had from February through early July, 2005 to gather the 225,000 signatures necessary to qualify for the November, 2005 ballot. Never tried to get signatures, no money raised.

2006

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did "Save Our $30 Tabs" Initiative I-917 -- formerly called "SaveOur30Tabs.com." The measure would have reestablished the cost of registering a vehicle -- cars, trucks, vans, SUV's, RV's, motor homes, motorcycles, etc. -- to a flat, fair, reasonable $30 per year. It repealed numerous state and local taxes and fees imposed on vehicles, including Governor Gregoire's weight fee on vehicles, Sound Transit's illegal vehicle tax, and other taxes and fees on vehicles and license plates (the Seattle Monorail vehicle tax is no longer being imposed on the taxpayers of Washington). Voters have twice approved $30 tabs and they would have supported this third attempt but the initiative was not certified for the ballot.

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did "Let The Voters Decide" Referendum 65. We sponsored this measure to give the voters the chance to have a public vote on House Bill 2661. Such an impactful public policy change should be made by the voters. Not enough signatures were gathered to qualify.

2007

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): did the "Taxpayer Protection Initiative (I-960)." We sponsored this measure to make it tougher for state government to raise taxes:

*Allow either two-thirds legislative approval or voter approval at an election for any tax increase,

*Ensure a public vote on any tax increase that the Legislature blocks by declaring it an "emergency," and

*Require public press releases by the state budget office for any bills proposing higher taxes (identifying their long-term costs and the bill's sponsors, voting records, and contact information)to be promptly and broadly disseminated to the people and the press at every stage of the legislative process. We collected and turned in over 300,000 voter signatures and so I-960 easily qualified for the ballot. In November 2007, the voters approved I-960, even though during the campaign for it, we were outspent $1.3 million to zero. I-960 became law in December 2007 and during 2008 and 2009, it stopped Gregoire and the Democrats from raising taxes. In 2008, Lisa Brown went to court to get the 2/3's requirement overturned. Attorney General Rob McKenna and his legal team successfully defended the taxpayers (we filed an amicus brief supporting I-960) and the State Supreme Court unanimously rejected Brown's lawsuit. It worked and is working exactly as voters intended.

2008

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): filed the "Reduce Traffic Congestion Initiative" (I-985) with the Secretary of State's office in the Capitol Dome in Olympia at 11 am, January 4th, 2008. We collected over 300,000 voter signatures and so I-985 easily qualified for the ballot. Unfortunately, the majority of voters did not approve the measure. Here's a short description of Initiative Measure No. 985: This measure would open high-occupancy vehicle lanes to all traffic during non-peak hours, require traffic light synchronization, increase roadside assistance funding, and dedicate certain vehicle taxes and red light camera profits, and other revenues to fund these traffic-flow purposes.

2009

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): filed the "Lower Property Taxes Initiative" (I-1033) with the Secretary of State's office in the Capitol Dome in Olympia on January 5th, 2009. We collected 315,444 voter signatures and so I-1033 easily qualified for the ballot. Unfortunately, the majority of voters did not approve the measure. Here's a short description of Initiative Measure No. 1033: This measure would limit growth of certain state, county and city revenue to annual inflation and population growth, not including voter-approved revenue increases. Revenue collected above the limit would reduce property tax levies.

2010

(Tim Eyman, Jack Fagan, Mike Fagan, Senator Don Benton, Senator Janea Holmquist, Michael Dunmire, Erma Turner, Nancy Nelson, Dagny Lord, & Keli Carender and our thousands of supporters statewide): filed the "Save The 2/3's Vote For Tax Increases Initiative" I-1053 with the Secretary of State's office in the Capitol Dome in Olympia at 10 am, January 11th, 2010. As we collected signatures, the public saw Gregoire and the Democrats vote to gut I-960 and radically raise taxes $7.1 billion. This super charged our signture drive and by July we had collected 337,726 signatures, easily qualifying for the ballot. Despite being outspend (opponents dropped $1.6 million on a "No" campaign), I-1053 passed with a whopping 64% yes vote, the biggest statewide victory we've ever had. I-1053 protects taxpayers by reinstating the requirement that the Legislature get either a two-thirds legislative vote or a majority public vote to raise taxes, and a majority vote in the Legislature to increase fees.

Also in 2010, we teamed up with Nick & Tiffany Sherwood at BanCams.com and Alex Rion at Washington's Campaign for Liberty to sponsor Mukilteo Initiative #2 "Let the People Decide on Red-Light Cameras in Mukilteo, a local measure in Eyman's hometown. We collected signatures from NEARLY HALF of all active registered voters in Mukilteo, easily qualifying for the ballot. The red-light camera company funded a don't-let-the-people-vote lawsuit but the lower court and state supreme court refused to block a public vote on our local initiative. Mukilteo voters responded with an astounding 71% yes vote. Mukilteo Initiative No. 2 overturned the city council's ordinance allowing red-light cameras and speed cameras, required a vote of the people if they ever try again, and removed the profit-motive by limiting fines to the least expensive parking ticket in Mukilteo ($20).

2011

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): filed the "Voters Want More Choices - Save the 2/3's" Initiative with the Secretary of State's office in the Capitol Dome in Olympia on January 10th, 2011. The campaign for this new initiative serves several purposes:

* I-1053's 2/3's for tax increases was a phenomenal victory - our new initiative protects it and extends it;
* It deters Olympia from undermining the 64% approved Initiative 1053 by reminding the Legislature that we're ready to go if they try to do to I-1053 what they did to I-960;

Here's an Associate Press story about it: Initiative promoter Tim Eyman also made his annual appearance, filing another initiative to require a two-thirds legislative majority for any tax increases. The same policy was reinstated by voters in November as Initiative 1053, but Eyman said he was trying to get ahead of any legislative moves to amend the measure. State lawmakers need to meet a difficult two-thirds vote threshold to amend initiatives for the first two years they are in effect, but may make changes by a simple majority vote after the two-year ban expires. Eyman said he plans to run the same tax-limiting policy every two years to keep it in effect indefinitely.

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): kicked off the signature drive for Initiative 1125, the "Protect Gas Taxes and Toll Revenues Act", in early May. The measure required that transportation money ONLY get spent on transportion (no diversions), mandated that the legislature set tolls, and required tolls to be uniform, project-specific, and end when the project's costs were paid. Submitted 325,000 voter signatures to the Secretary of State in July and succeeded at getting the initiative certified for the November, 2011 ballot. Despite being outspent by millions of dollars, the initiative was nearly approved. Post-election polling showed that all the provisions in I-1125 were very popular, except one: requiring the legislature to set tolls. We will continue to learn, adapt, and persevere.

As we said on election night: "For us to get this close is nothing short of remarkable," Tim Eyman said. "We spent nothing on this initiative, and the other side spent $2.5 million," he said. "Because of this vote, I think Olympia's plans to be tolling everywhere will only be able to proceed very slowly and very cautiously. I think 1125 made tolls even more radioactive. Jack, Mike, and I are very proud of Initiative 1125 and pleased with the support it received."

Also in 2011, we continued our crusade to allow local citizens to decide on red-light cameras. In November, Bellingham voters rejected cameras with 68% of the vote, Monroe voters also voted 68% against them, and Longview voters rejected them with 58% of the vote. In the city of Redmond, there wasn't a public vote but the 6000 voter signatures -- nearly half of active voters in the city -- convinced the council to cancel its program. Voters clearly oppose those obnoxious ticketing cameras.

(Tim, Jack, & Mike and thousands of supporters statewide): kicked off the signature drive for Initiative 1125, the "Protect Gas Taxes and Toll Revenues Act", in early May. The measure required that transportation money ONLY get spent on transportion (no diversions), mandated that the legislature set tolls, and required tolls to be uniform, project-specific, and end when the project's costs were paid. Submitted 325,000 voter signatures to the Secretary of State in July and succeeded at getting the initiative certified for the November, 2011 ballot. Despite being outspent by millions of dollars, the initiative was nearly approved. Post-election polling showed that all the provisions in I-1125 were very popular, except one: requiring the legislature to set tolls. We will continue to learn, adapt, and persevere.

As we said on election night: "For us to get this close is nothing short of remarkable," Tim Eyman said. "We spent nothing on this initiative, and the other side spent $2.5 million," he said. "Because of this vote, I think Olympia's plans to be tolling everywhere will only be able to proceed very slowly and very cautiously. I think 1125 made tolls even more radioactive. Jack, Mike, and I are very proud of Initiative 1125 and pleased with the support it received."

Also in 2011, we continued our crusade to allow local citizens to decide on red-light cameras. In November, Bellingham voters rejected cameras with 68% of the vote, Monroe voters also voted 68% against them, and Longview voters rejected them with 58% of the vote. In the city of Redmond, there wasn't a public vote but the 6000 voter signatures -- nearly half of active voters in the city -- convinced the council to cancel its program. Voters clearly oppose those obnoxious ticketing cameras.

2012

(Tim Eyman, Jack Fagan, Mike Fagan and our thousands of supporters statewide): filed Initiative 1185 ("Son of 1053") with the Secretary of State's office in January, 2012. By July we had collected 320,003 signatures, easily qualifying for the ballot. Despite being outspent (again), Initiative 1185 passed with a whopping 65% yes vote, the biggest statewide victory we've ever had. It was approved in all 39 counties and in every district outside Seattle. I-1185 protects taxpayers by reinstating the requirement that the Legislature get either a two-thirds legislative vote or a majority public vote to raise taxes, a majority vote in the Legislature to increase fees, and reinstated the advisory vote requirement for tax increases.

Tax Advisory Votes #1 & 2 -- the Legislature imposed two tax increases during the 2012 session and the public got to learn about each one. Advisory Vote #1 was a bank tax costing $170 million and Advisory Vote #2 was a oil companies' tax costing $25 million. Voters learned how legislators voted on each tax increase and were able to express their support/opposition for each one. The people overwhelmingly recommended repealing both tax increases, voting 57% against the bank tax and 55% against the oil companies' tax.

2013

Our top priority in 2013 was beating back tax increases (which explained our political action committee's name change to: Voters Want More Choices "No New Taxes 2013"). That meant fighting against countless bills that were pushed in Olympia to unilaterally increase taxes, including increased gas taxes, car tab taxes, death taxes, income taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, and many others. At one point, $15 billion in potential tax increases were being proposed. The Senate Majority Coalition Caucus, citing the voters' approval of our two-thirds-for-taxes initiative, took a hard line on tax increases. When the dust settled, only a handful of tax increases were passed.

We filed our newest tax initiative: "LET THE VOTERS DECIDE ON A 2/3-FOR-TAXES CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT." Allowing the voters to put this policy into the Constitution means permanent protection from Olympia's propensity to raise taxes. Our mission is to qualify it for a public vote.

Olympia's appetite for tax increases has not ended; it's only been suspended. The battle over tax increases will heat up again next year and the year after. And it's for that reason we will continue to pursue letting the voters vote on our initiative putting a 2/3-for-taxes constitutional amendment on the ballot.

YOU ONLY LOSE IF YOU QUIT AND WE ARE NOT QUITTING!

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